2021 Meditations new arrival (Everyman's Library Classics 2021 Series) online sale

2021 Meditations new arrival (Everyman's Library Classics 2021 Series) online sale

2021 Meditations new arrival (Everyman's Library Classics 2021 Series) online sale
2021 Meditations new arrival (Everyman's Library Classics 2021 Series) online sale__below

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Product Description

The Roman emperor Marcus Aurelius Antoninus (a.d. 121—180) embodied in his person that deeply cherished, ideal figure of antiquity, the philosopher-king. His Meditations are not only one of the most important expressions of the Stoic philosophy of his time but also an enduringly inspiring guide to living a good and just life. Written in moments snatched from military campaigns and the rigors of politics, these ethical and spiritual reflections reveal a mind of exceptional clarity and originality, and a spirit attuned to both the particulars of human destiny and the vast patterns that underlie it.

Review

The Meditations remain, unendingly moving and inspiring, the communings with itself of a thoughtful and devout soul upon the greatest of human issues. They are not, and do not claim to be, a work of original philosophy, nor yet a systematic exposition of a tradition of thought. They speak for themselves. Only by the slenderest of chances have they come down to the modern world at all . . . but the number of times they have been published . . . and above all translated into a vast variety of tongues, would have filled their author with amazement.” –from the Introduction by D. A. Rees

From the Inside Flap

Introduction by D. A. Rees; Translation by A. S. L. Farquarson

From the Back Cover

The Roman emperor Marcus Aurelius Antoninus embodied in his person that deeply cherished, ideal figure of antiquity, the philosopher-king. His Meditations, written in moments snatched from military campaigns and the rigors of politics, reveal a mind of exceptional clarity and originality, and a spirit attuned to both the particulars of human destiny and the vast patterns which underlie it.

About the Author

Marcus Aurelius Antoninus was born to an upper-class Roman family in A.D. 121 and was later adopted by the future emperor Antoninus Pius, whom he succeeded in 161. His reign was marked by a successful campaign against Parthia, but was overshadowed in later years by plague, an abortive revolt in the eastern provinces, and the deaths of friends and family, including his co-emperor Lucius Verus. A student of philosophy from his earliest youth, he was especially influenced by the first-century Stoic thinker Epictetus. His later reputation rests on his Meditations, written during his later years and never meant for formal publication. He died in 180, while campaigning against the barbarian tribes on Rome’s northern frontier.

A. S. L. Farquharson (1871—1942) spent a lifetime on his edition of the  Meditations, which is one of the outstanding twentieth-century achievements of classical scholarship. All the notes to the Farquharson translation, amplifying the twelve books of the  Meditations, are included in this volume.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Book 1

Debts and Lessons

 

1. My grandfather Verus

Character and self-control.

 

2. My father (from my own memories and his reputation)

Integrity and manliness.

 

3. My mother

Her reverence for the divine, her generosity, her inability not only to do wrong but even to conceive of doing it. And the simple way she lived-not in the least like the rich.

 

4. My great-grandfather

To avoid the public schools, to hire good private teachers, and to accept the resulting costs as money well-spent.

 

5. My first teacher

Not to support this side or that in chariot-racing, this fighter or that in the games. To put up with discomfort and not make demands. To do my own work, mind my own business, and have no time for slanderers.

 

6. Diognetus

Not to waste time on nonsense. Not to be taken in by conjurors and hoodoo artists with their talk about incantations and exorcism and all the rest of it. Not to be obsessed with quail-fighting or other crazes like that. To hear unwelcome truths. To practice philosophy, and to study with Baccheius, and then with Tandasis and Marcianus. To write dialogues as a student. To choose the Greek lifestyle-the camp-bed and the cloak.

 

7. Rusticus

The recognition that I needed to train and discipline my character.

Not to be sidetracked by my interest in rhetoric. Not to write treatises on abstract questions, or deliver moralizing little sermons, or compose imaginary descriptions of The Simple Life or The Man Who Lives Only for Others. To steer clear of oratory, poetry and belles lettres.

Not to dress up just to stroll around the house, or things like that. To write straightforward letters (like the one he sent my mother from Sinuessa). And to behave in a conciliatory way when people who have angered or annoyed us want to make up.

To read attentively-not to be satisfied with "just getting the gist of it." And not to fall for every smooth talker.

And for introducing me to Epictetus''s lectures-and loaning me his own copy.


8. Apollonius

Independence and unvarying reliability, and to pay attention to nothing, no matter how fleetingly, except the logos. And to be the same in all circumstances-intense pain, the loss of a child, chronic illness. And to see clearly, from his example, that a man can show both strength and flexibility.

His patience in teaching. And to have seen someone who clearly viewed his expertise and ability as a teacher as the humblest of virtues.

And to have learned how to accept favors from friends without losing your self-respect or appearing ungrateful.


9. Sextus

Kindness.

An example of fatherly authority in the home. What it means to live as nature requires.

Gravity without airs.

To show intuitive sympathy for friends, tolerance to amateurs and sloppy thinkers. His ability to get along with everyone: sharing his company was the highest of compliments, and the opportunity an honor for those around him.

To investigate and analyze, with understanding and logic, the principles we ought to live by.

Not to display anger or other emotions. To be free of passion and yet full of love.

To praise without bombast; to display expertise without pretension.


10. The literary critic Alexander

Not to be constantly correcting people, and in particular not to jump on them whenever they make an error of usage or a grammatical mistake or mispronounce something, but just answer their question or add another example, or debate the issue itself (not their phrasing), or make some other contribution to the discussion-and casually insert the correct expression.

 

11. Fronto

To recognize the malice, cunning and hypocrisy that power produces, and the peculiar ruthlessness often shown by people from "good families."

 

12. Alexander the Platonist

Not to be constantly telling people (or writing them) that I''m too busy, unless I really am. Similarly, not to be always ducking my responsibilities to the people around me because of "pressing business."

 

13. Catulus

Not to shrug off a friend''s resentment-even unjustified resentment-but try to put things right.

To show your teachers ungrudging respect (the Domitius and Athenodotus story), and your children unfeigned love.

 

14. [My brother] Severus

To love my family, truth and justice. It was through him that I encountered Thrasea, Helvidius, Cato, Dion and Brutus, and conceived of a society of equal laws, governed by equality of status and of speech, and of rulers who respect the liberty of their subjects above all else.

And from him as well, to be steady and consistent in valuing philosophy.

And to help others and be eager to share, not to be a pessimist, and never to doubt your friends'' affection for you. And that when people incurred his disapproval, they always knew it. And that his friends never had to speculate about his attitude to anything: it was always clear.

 

15. Maximus

Self-control and resistance to distractions.

Optimism in adversity-especially illness.

A personality in balance: dignity and grace together.

Doing your job without whining.

Other people''s certainty that what he said was what he thought, and what he did was done without malice.

Never taken aback or apprehensive. Neither rash nor hesitant-or bewildered, or at a loss. Not obsequious-but not aggressive or paranoid either.

Generosity, charity, honesty.

The sense he gave of staying on the path rather than being kept on it.

That no one could ever have felt patronized by him-or in a position to patronize him.

A sense of humor.

 

16. My adopted father

Compassion. Unwavering adherence to decisions, once he''d reached them. Indifference to superficial honors. Hard work. Persistence.

Listening to anyone who could contribute to the public good.

His dogged determination to treat people as they deserved.

A sense of when to push and when to back off.

Putting a stop to the pursuit of boys.

His altruism. Not expecting his friends to keep him entertained at dinner or to travel with him (unless they wanted to). And anyone who had to stay behind to take care of something always found him the same when he returned.

His searching questions at meetings. A kind of single-mindedness, almost, never content with first impressions, or breaking off the discussion prematurely.

His constancy to friends-never getting fed up with them, or playing favorites.

Self-reliance, always. And cheerfulness.

And his advance planning (well in advance) and his discreet attention to even minor things.

His restrictions on acclamations-and all attempts to flatter him.

His constant devotion to the empire''s needs. His stewardship of the treasury. His willingness to take responsibility-and blame-for both.

His attitude to the gods: no superstitiousness. And his attitude to men: no demagoguery, no currying favor, no pandering. Always sober, always steady, and never vulgar or a prey to fads.

The way he handled the material comforts that fortune had supplied him in such abundance-without arrogance and without apology. If they were there, he took advantage of them. If not, he didn''t miss them.

No one ever called him glib, or shameless, or pedantic. They saw him for what he was: a man tested by life, accomplished, unswayed by flattery, qualified to govern both himself and them.

His respect for people who practiced philosophy-at least, those who were sincere about it. But without denigrating the others-or listening to them.

His ability to feel at ease with people-and put them at their ease, without being pushy.

His willingness to take adequate care of himself. Not a hypochondriac or obsessed with his appearance, but not ignoring things either. With the result that he hardly ever needed medical attention, or drugs or any sort of salve or ointment.

This, in particular: his willingness to yield the floor to experts-in oratory, law, psychology, whatever-and to support them energetically, so that each of them could fulfil his potential.

That he respected tradition without needing to constantly congratulate himself for Safeguarding Our Traditional Values.

Not prone to go off on tangents, or pulled in all directions, but sticking with the same old places and the same old things.

The way he could have one of his migraines and then go right back to what he was doing-fresh and at the top of his game.

That he had so few secrets-only state secrets, in fact, and not all that many of those.

The way he kept public actions within reasonable bounds-games, building projects, distributions of money and so on-because he looked to what needed doing and not the credit to be gained from doing it.

No bathing at strange hours, no self-indulgent building projects, no concern for food, or the cut and color of his clothes, or having attractive slaves. (The robe from his farm at Lorium, most of the things at Lanuvium, the way he accepted the customs agent''s apology at Tusculum, etc.)

He never exhibited rudeness, lost control of himself, or turned violent. No one ever saw him sweat. Everything was to be approached logically and with due consideration, in a calm and orderly fashion but decisively, and with no loose ends.

You could have said of him (as they say of Socrates) that he knew how to enjoy and abstain from things that most people find it hard to abstain from and all too easy to enjoy. Strength, perseverance, self-control in both areas: the mark of a soul in readiness-indomitable.

(Maximus''s illness.)

 

17. The Gods

That I had good grandparents, a good mother and father, a good sister, good teachers, good servants, relatives, friends-almost without exception. And that I never lost control of myself with any of them, although I had it in me to do that, and I might have, easily. But thanks to the gods, I was never put in that position, and so escaped the test.

That I wasn''t raised by my grandfather''s girlfriend for longer than I was. That I didn''t lose my virginity too early, and didn''t enter adulthood until it was time-put it off, even.

That I had someone-as a ruler and as a father-who could keep me from being arrogant and make me realize that even at court you can live without a troop of bodyguards, and gorgeous clothes, lamps, sculpture-the whole charade. That you can behave almost like an ordinary person without seeming slovenly or careless as a ruler or when carrying out official obligations.

That I had the kind of brother I did. One whose character challenged me to improve my own. One whose love and affection enriched my life.

That my children weren''t born stupid or physically deformed.

That I wasn''t more talented in rhetoric or poetry, or other areas. If I''d felt that I was making better progress I might never have given them up.

That I conferred on the people who brought me up the honors they seemed to want early on, instead of putting them off (since they were still young) with the hope that I''d do it later.

That I knew Apollonius, and Rusticus, and Maximus.

That I saw was shown clearly and often what it would be like to live as nature requires. The gods did all they could-through their gifts, their help, their inspiration-to ensure that I could live as nature demands. And if I''ve failed, it''s no one''s fault but mine. Because I didn''t pay attention to what they told me-to what they taught me, practically, step by step.

That my body has held out, especially considering the life I''ve led.

That I never laid a finger on Benedicta or on Theodotus. And that even later, when I was overcome by passion, I recovered from it.

That even though I was often upset with Rusticus I never did anything I would have regretted later.

That even though she died young, at least my mother spent her last years with me.

That whenever I felt like helping someone who was short of money, or otherwise in need, I never had to be told that I had no resources to do it with. And that I was never put in that position myself-of having to take something from someone else.

That I have the wife I do: obedient, loving, humble.

That children had competent teachers.

Remedies granted through dreams-when I was coughing blood, for instance, and having fits of dizziness. And the one at Caieta.

That when I became interested in philosophy I didn''t fall into the hands of charlatans, and didn''t get bogged down in writing treatises, or become absorbed by logic-chopping, or preoccupied with physics.

All things for which "we need the help of fortune and the gods."

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4.7 out of 54.7 out of 5
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Top reviews from the United States

Jose
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
One of the Greatest Stoic Philosophers
Reviewed in the United States on August 23, 2017
A hard read, though it is only 93 pages (the Meditations themselves, excluding introduction and notes). Do not however, concern yourself with the stylistic choices of the translation, though at times it may be confusing or simply bland. You cannot blame the translator for... See more
A hard read, though it is only 93 pages (the Meditations themselves, excluding introduction and notes). Do not however, concern yourself with the stylistic choices of the translation, though at times it may be confusing or simply bland. You cannot blame the translator for translating the Meditations, and you cannot blame Marcus for writing his journal his way, without ever believing anyone else would read it, for that does not matter. I have no criticism, simply I point out this book is not a light read.

If you are apt to reading philosophy, profound books that give you insight into the universe and your place in it, I cannot think of any greater book than the Meditations. Marcus Aurelius has been called Plato''s philosopher-king, and though I disagree with this, I see the point: he ruled the Roman Empire near its greatest extent with the virtues of fundamental stoicism. He did not want or consent to Plato''s Republic, but he put his duties, his loved ones, and his country before his own interests. He rejected luxury and comfort. He wrote to remind himself to lead by example, that he is the master of himself, that emotions cannot puppeteer him, and that pleasures cannot warp his logic and his will to do good. He reminded himself to always be favorable to all that came by him, even those that disagreed with him and spoke ill of him, for he believed they were brought to the earth to work together. He rejected unreasonable condemnation and unhelpful criticism as well as praise and arrogant pride. He looked to correct, not condemn, the ignorant, and stand agreeable and thankful, not prideful and bashful, when corrected. He praised the universe for her inner-workings, borrowing from Plato''s idea that all that is natural must in turn be good, if not for the individual, then for the whole, which then must still be good for the individual regardless. His metaphysics are not scientifically sound, the same for Plato, a large influence, but they do tap into the imagination.

He ponders most on death. Death is natural, and all that comes from nature must be good, therefore death is good. He reminds himself to never fear death as he would never fear breathing, or his eyes never fear seeing, or his hands ever fear writing. Death is a product of life, as sight is a product of the eyes, and writing all product of the hands, all natural consequences of being. What is there to fear? Nothing. What is there to be angry about? Nothing. When irritated, whose fault is it? Yours, for allowing exterior happenings you cannot control affect your inner peace.

My favorite part of the entire book is when he ponders on inner peace. Many would seek peace retiring to a calm village, a seaside home, or in the mountains far from the busy cities. Marcus argues he who has not inner peace in himself wherever, will never have inner peace whatever. Surroundings matter not, only your attitude. This is the biggest lesson of the Meditations, the greatest wisdom Marcus has to offer: it is your reaction to life, not life itself, that creates happiness. This was the principle Nelson Mandela stuck to when he was imprisoned. This is the principal that is the core of stoicism.

"You have power over your mind - not outside events. Realize this, and you will find strength."

Pick up this book. It would be unfortunate going through life, pondering how to bring yourself happiness, when the secret to happiness was found 2,000 years ago. You do not have to accept all Marcus says, I do not agree with him on all things. But his wisdom is invaluable.
430 people found this helpful
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The M4chin3
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
and Socrates is my great uncle and Thales is my grand father
Reviewed in the United States on March 7, 2017
I am sincerely pissed that I was not provided a copy of this as a kid growing up. I have devised a work around to the whole "Not growing up with a father figure" issue. I have decided that Marcus Aurealis is my actual father, and Socrates is my great uncle and... See more
I am sincerely pissed that I was not provided a copy of this as a kid growing up. I have devised a work around to the whole "Not growing up with a father figure" issue. I have decided that Marcus Aurealis is my actual father, and Socrates is my great uncle and Thales is my grand father. I realize this sounds nutty to read but I honestly feel more in common with these thinkers then the absent XY chromosome donor.
800 people found this helpful
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Tyler
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
It’s so small
Reviewed in the United States on August 17, 2021
The size of this book is somewhere between a pamphlet, a pocket bible, and a passport. For abnormally sized objects, it’s within reason to expect that the size would be specified either one in the name or at least one of the images. Typically, an object such as this would... See more
The size of this book is somewhere between a pamphlet, a pocket bible, and a passport. For abnormally sized objects, it’s within reason to expect that the size would be specified either one in the name or at least one of the images. Typically, an object such as this would include the word “small” or “mini” in the name or would include a photo that displays the length, width, and height.

The products dimensions are listed very far down on the page, but it is otherwise represented as a normally sized book.
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Craig Matteson
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Writings of a Roman Emperor - with many helpful notes
Reviewed in the United States on July 6, 2005
There are several things that make this book so special. It is written by a Roman Emperor and is a book of introspective philosophy rather than a publication of his public acts or justifications for his career. Although it was written in the Christian era, it is clearly a... See more
There are several things that make this book so special. It is written by a Roman Emperor and is a book of introspective philosophy rather than a publication of his public acts or justifications for his career. Although it was written in the Christian era, it is clearly a non-Christian work and that makes it very interesting as well. One of the problems we have understanding such a work is that our culture, though largely post-Christian nowadays, is rooted in and permeated by Christian concepts and institutions. Be careful as you read this book to not let your present-day mindset fool you into thinking you understand what this mind from a different world of almost 2,000 years ago wrote.

The book is arranged in chapters - what we would call paragraphs. And books - that we would call chapters. They were written at different times and not meant to be a coherent statement of the author''s beliefs. Often, they seem to be advice to himself.

About one-half of this book is notes to help the reader understand what Marcus Aurelius wrote. This is quite necessary, because it is so easy to get off on the wrong track by misreading what is actually being said in this austere and often quite strange book.

Yet, it has a nice payoff in helping the reader see the world a bit differently and to bring that portion of the history of the Roman Empire to life.
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Amazon Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great book!
Reviewed in the United States on September 30, 2021
Enjoy the wisdom contained in the readings.
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bear
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great
Reviewed in the United States on June 13, 2021
Great
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Amazon Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Book
Reviewed in the United States on December 19, 2019
Good classic.
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Jamie Wojnowski
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Excellent read
Reviewed in the United States on August 13, 2021
Very good book . Excellent gift
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Top reviews from other countries

Emma
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Like a bible but for atheists
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on August 30, 2020
Beautiful book, lovely cover and quality. Thought-provoking, meaningful.
6 people found this helpful
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Timecop
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Haven''t even opened it
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on May 5, 2021
Haven''t even opened it. Great book.
2 people found this helpful
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Yousaf wazir
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
One who seeks a simple answer to life
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on May 26, 2021
Life changing. Some may argue or dispute this, let not those judgments affect your own. Make your own judgment after reading it yourself. I cannot say anything else.
2 people found this helpful
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Robbie
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Front cover torn
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on December 13, 2020
Front cover torn, bit disappointed.
2 people found this helpful
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Rambo
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Ancient wisdom
Reviewed in Australia on September 10, 2020
I was surprised at how small this book is - it literally fits in the palm of my hand. Apart form that, it is a very nice little hardback edition of one of the best guides to life ever written. The dust jacket is a nice touch, the book covers are embossed, and the pages are...See more
I was surprised at how small this book is - it literally fits in the palm of my hand. Apart form that, it is a very nice little hardback edition of one of the best guides to life ever written. The dust jacket is a nice touch, the book covers are embossed, and the pages are thick with no printing errors. There is even a ribbon marker to keep track of your daily wisdom. If you are at all interested in bettering yourself as a human being, read Meditations. And if you want a small quality version, buy this.
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2021 Meditations new arrival (Everyman's Library Classics 2021 Series) online sale

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2021 Meditations new arrival (Everyman's Library Classics 2021 Series) online sale

2021 Meditations new arrival (Everyman's Library Classics 2021 Series) online sale

2021 Meditations new arrival (Everyman's Library Classics 2021 Series) online sale

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2021 Meditations new arrival (Everyman's Library Classics 2021 Series) online sale

2021 Meditations new arrival (Everyman's Library Classics 2021 Series) online sale

2021 Meditations new arrival (Everyman's Library Classics 2021 Series) online sale

2021 Meditations new arrival (Everyman's Library Classics 2021 Series) online sale