2021 The online online Undocumented Americans online sale

2021 The online online Undocumented Americans online sale

2021 The online online Undocumented Americans online sale
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NATIONAL BOOK AWARD FINALIST • One of the first undocumented immigrants to graduate from Harvard reveals the hidden lives of her fellow undocumented Americans in this deeply personal and groundbreaking portrait of a nation.

“Karla’s book sheds light on people’s personal experiences and allows their stories to be told and their voices to be heard.”—Selena Gomez

FINALIST FOR THE NBCC JOHN LEONARD AWARD
• NAMED A BEST BOOK OF THE YEAR BY THE LOS ANGELES TIMES, THE NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW, NPR, THE NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY, BOOK RIOT, LIBRARY JOURNAL, AND TIME

Writer Karla Cornejo Villavicencio was on DACA when she decided to write about being undocumented for the first time using her own name. It was right after the election of 2016, the day she realized the story she’d tried to steer clear of was the only one she wanted to tell.  So she wrote her immigration lawyer’s phone number on her hand in Sharpie and embarked on a trip across the country to tell the stories of her fellow undocumented immigrants—and to find the hidden key to her own. 
 
Looking beyond the flashpoints of the border or the activism of the DREAMers, Cornejo Villavicencio explores the lives of the undocumented—and the mysteries of her own life. She finds the singular, effervescent characters across the nation often reduced in the media to political pawns or nameless laborers. The stories she tells are not deferential or naively inspirational but show the love, magic, heartbreak, insanity, and vulgarity that infuse the day-to-day lives of her subjects. 
 
In New York, we meet the undocumented workers who were recruited into the federally funded Ground Zero cleanup after 9/11. In Miami, we enter the ubiquitous botanicas, which offer medicinal herbs and potions to those whose status blocks them from any other healthcare options. In Flint, Michigan, we learn of demands for state ID in order to receive life-saving clean water. In Connecticut, Cornejo Villavicencio, childless by choice, finds family in two teenage girls whose father is in sanctuary. And through it all we see the author grappling with the biggest questions of love, duty, family, and survival. 
 
In her incandescent, relentlessly probing voice, Karla Cornejo Villavicencio combines sensitive reporting and powerful personal narratives to bring to light remarkable stories of resilience, madness, and death. Through these stories we come to understand what it truly means to be a stray. An expendable. A hero. An American.

Review

“Punk and dazzling and remarkably human . . . like watching firecrackers go off.” —Jia Tolentino

“Brilliant, vivid, tender, furious.” —Louise Erdrich

“A scream and a song . . . a complex, human look at the fabric of this nation.” —Quiara Alegría Hudes

“In her captivating and evocative first book, The Undocumented Americans, [Karla] Cornejo Villavicencio aims to tell ‘the full story’ of what it means to be undocumented in America, in all of its fraughtness and complexity, challenging the usual good and evil categories through a series of memoir-infused reported essays. In doing so, she reveals how her subjects, including her own family members, struggle with vices like adultery and self-harm, even while doing backbreaking, demeaning work to support their families. . . . Cornejo Villavicencio reveals a fullness of character that feels subversive, simply because of how rare it is.” The New York Times Book Review

“There’s nothing to do but sit down and read this book. Inside it, I feel deep in being, immersed in a frankness and a swerving bright and revelatory funkiness I have not encountered ever before concerning the collective daily life of an undocumented family in America. It is a radical human story and Karla Cornejo Villavicencio is a great writer.” —Eileen Myles

“Karla Cornejo Villavicencio offers an un inching indictment of
our current immigration system. This is the book we’ve been waiting for.” —Roberto G. Gonzales, author of Lives in Limbo: Undocumented and Coming of Age in America

“Profoundly intimate . . . Karla Cornejo Villavicencio’s highly personal and deeply empathetic perspective serves as a powerful rebuttal
to characterizations of undocumented immigrants as criminals and welfare cheats.” Publishers Weekly

“This valuable and authentic inquiry is powerfully embellished with magical imaginings, as when she envisions a man drowning during Hurricane Sandy’s last moments. Cornejo Villavicencio’s unfiltered and vulnerable voice incorporates both explosive profanity and elegiac incantations of despair, as, for example, when she internalizes the hatred toward brown people manifest in the poisoning of Flint, Michigan’s water supply. She gives of herself unstintingly as she speaks with undocumented day laborers, older people working long past retirement age, and a housekeeper who relies on the botanica and voodoo for health care. Cornejo Villavicencio’s challenging and moving testimonio belongs in all collections.” Booklist (starred review)
 
“Memorable . . . compelling . . . heartwrenching . . . a welcome addition to the literature on immigration told by an author who understands the issue like few others.” Kirkus Reviews

About the Author

Karla Cornejo Villavicencio has written about immigration, music, beauty, and mental illness for The New York Times, The Atlantic, The New Republic, Glamour, Elle, Vogue, n+1, and The New Inquiry, among others. She lives in New Haven with her partner and their dog.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Chapter 1

Staten Island

August 1, 2019

If you ask my mother where she’s from, she’s 100 percent going to say she’s from the Kingdom of God, because she does not like to say that she’s from Ecuador, Ecuador being one of the few South American countries that has not especially outdone itself on the international stage—magical realism basically skipped over it, as did the military dictatorship craze of the 1970s and 1980s, plus there are no world-famous Ecuadorians to speak of other than the fool who housed Julian Assange at the embassy in London (the president) and Christina Aguilera’s father, who was a domestic abuser. If you ask my father where he is from, he will definitely say Ecuador because he is sentimental about the country for reasons he’s working out in therapy. But if you push them, I mean really push them, they’re both going to say they’re from New York. If you ask them if they feel American because you’re a little narc who wants to prove your blood runs red, white, and blue, they’re going to say No, we feel like New Yorkers. We really do, too. My family has lived in Brooklyn and Queens a combined ninety-seven years. My dad drove a cab back when East New York was still gang country, and he had to fold his body into a little origami swan and hide under his steering wheel during cross fires in the middle of the day while he ate a jumbo slice of pizza. Times have changed but my parents haven’t. My dad sees struggling bodegas and he says they’re fronts. For what? Money laundering. For whom? The mob. My mother wants my brother and me to wear pastels all year round to avoid being seen as taking sides in the little tiff between the Bloods and the Crips.

My parents are New Yorkers to the core. Despite how close we are, we’ve talked very little about their first days in New York or about their decision to choose New York, or even the United States, as a destination. It’s not that I haven’t asked my parents why they came to the United States. It’s that the answer isn’t as morally satisfying as most people’s answers are—a decapitated family member, famine—and I never press them for more details because I don’t want to apply pressure on a bruise.

The story as far as I know it goes something like this: My parents had just gotten married in Cotopaxi, Ecuador, and their small autobody business was not doing well. Then my dad got into a car crash where he broke his jaw, and they had to borrow money from my father’s family, who are bad, greedy people. The idea of coming to America to work for a year to make just enough money to pay off the debt came up and it seemed like a good idea. My father’s family asked to keep me, eighteen months old at the time, as collateral. And that’s what my parents did. That’s about as much as I know.

You may be wondering why my parents agreed to leave me as an economic assurance, but the truth is I have not had this conversation with them. I’ve never thought about it enough to ask. The whole truth is that if I was a young mother—if I was me as a young mother, unparented, ambitious, at my sexual prime—I think I would be thrilled to leave my child for “exactly a year,” as they said it would be, which is what the plan was. I never had to forgive my mom.

My dad? My dadmydadmydad was my earliest memory. He was dressed in a powder-blue sweater. He was walking into a big airplane. I looked out from a window and my dad was walking away and, in my hand, I carried a Ziploc bag full of coins. I don’t know. It’s been almost thirty years. It doesn’t matter anymore.

My parents didn’t come back after a year. They didn’t stay in America because they were making so much money that they became greedy. They were barely making ends meet. Years passed. When I was four years old, going to school in Ecuador, teachers began to comment on how gifted I was. My parents knew Ecuador was not the place for a gifted girl—the gender politics were too f***ed up—and they wanted me to have all the educational opportunities they hadn’t had. So that’s when they brought me to New York to enroll me in Catholic school, but no matter how hard they both worked to make tuition, they fell short. Then one day—I think I was in the fourth grade—the school bursar called me into his office and explained that there was an elderly billionairess who lived in upstate New York who had heard about me and was impressed. He told her my family was poor and might have to pull me from the school. (Okay, so in this scenario the tragedy would have been that I’d have to go to the local public school, which was not a great school, but just so we’re on the same page, I support public schools and I would have been fine.) So she came up with a proposition. She’d pay for most of my tuition if I kept up my grades and wrote her letters.

That was the first time in my life I’d have a benefactor, but it would not be my last. When I was at Harvard, a very successful Wall Street man who knew me from an educational NGO we both belonged to—he as a supporter, me as a supported—learned I was undocumented and could not legally hold a work-study job, so every semester he wrote me a modest check. In the notes section he cheekily wrote “beer money”—the joke being that I wouldn’t really drink until I was twenty-one—but every semester I used it for books, winter coats for those f***ing Boston winters, money I couldn’t ask my parents for because they didn’t have any to give. I wrote him regular emails about my life at Harvard and my budding success as a published writer. He was always appropriate and boundaried. I had read obsessively about artists since I was a kid and considered myself an artist since I was a kid so I didn’t feel weird about older, wealthy white people giving me money in exchange for grades or writing. It was patronage. They were Gertrude Stein and I was a young Hemingway. I was Van Gogh, crazy and broken. I truly did not have any racial anxieties about this, thank god. That kind of thing could really f*** a kid up.

I’m a New York City kid, but although the first five years of my time in America were spent in Brooklyn, if we’re going to be real, I’m from Queens. Queens is the most diverse borough in the city. This might sound like a romanticized ghetto painting, but when I walk through my neighborhood, a Polish child with a toy gun will shoot at my head and say the same undecipherable word over and over; a Puerto Rican kid will rap along to a song on his phone and turn it up as loud as necessary to make out the lyrics, even rapping along to some N-words; some Egyptian teenagers will refuse to move out of my way as I’m simply trying to cross the street; and some Mexican guys will invite me to join a pyramid scheme. But none of us will try to take any rights away from each other. We don’t have potlucks, but we live in peace. We go to the same street fairs.

The other boroughs are less diverse, but I found that the same thing is basically true. Except for one borough that I was always curious about—Staten Island, New York’s richest, whitest, most suburban borough. It is almost 80 percent white. By way of comparison, Brooklyn and Queens are just less than half white, the Bronx is 45 percent white, and even Manhattan is only 65 percent white. Staten Island is geographically isolated—you can’t take the subway there from the city—and, I don’t know, man, there isn’t a lot of shared goodwill between islanders and city residents. It’s not like we’re unaware. They’ve literally tried to secede from New York City and form their own city or join New Jersey. In June 1989, the New York State legislature gave Staten Island residents the right to decide on secession, and in November 1993, 65 percent of voters voted yes. Governor Mario Cuomo insisted that the referendum be approved by the state legislature, where it was defeated, but the desire continued to bubble just beneath the surface for years, so even after the world was rocked by Brexit, you had local island politicians posting on social media about how inspiring an event it was. Staten Island is the city’s most conservative borough, pretty reliably Republican, the only borough in New York City to go for Donald Trump in the 2016 presidential election. It’s also the borough where Eric Garner was killed in a choke hold at the hands of NYPD officer Daniel Pantaleo. A Staten Island grand jury declined to indict Pantaleo for murder.

I learned about all of this later. But the first time Staten Island really entered my consciousness was when there were news reports about hate crimes against Latinx people when I was a kid. This was the only context in which Staten Island was mentioned on Spanish nightly news—Mexican immigrants as victims of hate crimes at the hands of young black men, a cruel reminder of the rift between our communities.

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4.6 out of 54.6 out of 5
1,446 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

Marian Claire
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
We need more books like this!
Reviewed in the United States on May 2, 2020
I would challenge one who tends to stereotype immigrants in a negative light to please open your mind and heart to read this book. It is convenient to collectively write off an entire ethnic group.....just like checking a box you no longer have to think about. But we DO... See more
I would challenge one who tends to stereotype immigrants in a negative light to please open your mind and heart to read this book. It is convenient to collectively write off an entire ethnic group.....just like checking a box you no longer have to think about. But we DO have to think about it, as a moral imperative and for the hope that we are capable of restoring humanity in our world during these dark times.
One person who wrote a negative review indicated that the author should have more gratitude for the education she received at the expense of American taxpayers. That mentality perpetuates the concept that this is a class of people who have less human value intrinsically. By pure accident of location of birth, any one of us could exchange places with the individuals whose stories are told in this book. If you think about your own humanity that way, you may come to see the humanity in others.
105 people found this helpful
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Riggo
2.0 out of 5 stars
I understand the anger, but....
Reviewed in the United States on April 12, 2020
This was a very insightful book. I felt the author''s anger at how the undocumented are treated, however, as an American it made me kind of angry. We have laws in the U.S. and as much as I dislike the treatment of undocumented workers, they can not just come here and... See more
This was a very insightful book. I felt the author''s anger at how the undocumented are treated, however, as an American it made me kind of angry. We have laws in the U.S. and as much as I dislike the treatment of undocumented workers, they can not just come here and expect the same privileges as Americans. As an American, I can''t just pick up and move to Sweden; as much as I would like to.
The author graduated from Harvard! Wow, that is awesome. I think some gratitude that this was paid for from Americans, nonetheless, would be appreciated. Many in the U.S. are not even able to attend this school...even though they are just as smart. Anyway, good read...but, the bitterness made it hard for me to feel sorry for her struggle.
94 people found this helpful
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CA
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Phenomenal & Important Story
Reviewed in the United States on May 3, 2020
This book is a powerful account of what it’s like to be Undocumented in the US. The author put so much time and effort into capturing these stories and allowing all of us a glimpse into other’s lives. Even more importantly, it allows undocumented people to finally see their... See more
This book is a powerful account of what it’s like to be Undocumented in the US. The author put so much time and effort into capturing these stories and allowing all of us a glimpse into other’s lives. Even more importantly, it allows undocumented people to finally see their stories portrayed (please don’t lose sight of this as you read, rate and review this book. The intended audience is other undocumented individuals, especially young people. The rest of us are here as guests.)

The author paints each person as just that, a human being with nuances and complexity. A truly phenomenal piece of art that everyone needs to read.

Much of this book can be difficult to read, especially if you go in with no knowledge of the plight and treatment of those who live undocumented in the US. It’s in our anger and discomfort that we learn. These fellow Americans deserve our time to learn more, and advocacy for better treatment and protections. (And if you’re someone who’s yelling about the “rules”, I’d encourage you to sit with what you’re saying about the importance of your life vs. someone else’s.)
57 people found this helpful
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T. Beard
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Buyer Beware
Reviewed in the United States on September 14, 2020
I was disappointed in this book after reading so many glowing reviews. The profanity was offensive and an unwelcome distraction. Obviously the author has had her share of struggles and tried to overcome them. Kudos to her. But her struggle with mental illness and the... See more
I was disappointed in this book after reading so many glowing reviews. The profanity was offensive and an unwelcome distraction. Obviously the author has had her share of struggles and tried to overcome them. Kudos to her. But her struggle with mental illness and the bitterness in her life were overwhelming and, again, a distraction from why I purchased the book - to read about the plight of undocumented Americans. I thought this book was of a journalistic nature, not a biography. I''m giving the book 2 stars because the author does enlighten us about the struggles of illegal immigrants in the chapters about New York, Flint, and Miami. Too bad I had to shift through so much extraneous and superfluous stuff to find that small bit of information.
44 people found this helpful
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Debra Thomas
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
This Book Should Be Sent to the Supreme Court ASAP
Reviewed in the United States on May 25, 2020
As a former high school English teacher in a predominantly Latinx community and as an ESL teacher to Spanish-speaking adults, these are the stories that I’ve heard but rarely read about, the real lives of undocumented Americans and the DACA youth whose hopes hang in the... See more
As a former high school English teacher in a predominantly Latinx community and as an ESL teacher to Spanish-speaking adults, these are the stories that I’ve heard but rarely read about, the real lives of undocumented Americans and the DACA youth whose hopes hang in the balance. With keen insight and unflinching honesty, the author has taken us around the country and into the corners of these individual lives, while at the same time exploring her complex feelings about the her own undocumented family. An important book at a crucial time in our country.
39 people found this helpful
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Marilyn Z.
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Raw, passionate and inspirational.
Reviewed in the United States on May 1, 2020
This book is wonderfully written. It gives a raw account of what it really means to grow up undocumented in this country. It goes beyond what the media so often barely taps into. It also gives a very personal account of what it is like to grow up as a daughter of immigrant... See more
This book is wonderfully written. It gives a raw account of what it really means to grow up undocumented in this country. It goes beyond what the media so often barely taps into. It also gives a very personal account of what it is like to grow up as a daughter of immigrant parents and feel forever indebted to them for all the sacrifices they make for their children. This book needs to be added to school curriculum across the nation to shine a much needed light on the real lives and stories of undocumented Americans everywhere.
23 people found this helpful
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arianna
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
ESSENTIAL!
Reviewed in the United States on May 5, 2020
"The Undocumented Americans" by Karla Cornejo Villavicencio was an extremely powerful, touching and essential read. I want to start off by saying this book has so much information covering undocumented Americans and their lives. Villavicencio takes us on a journey from... See more
"The Undocumented Americans" by Karla Cornejo Villavicencio was an extremely powerful, touching and essential read.
I want to start off by saying this book has so much information covering undocumented Americans and their lives. Villavicencio takes us on a journey from Staten Island, Ground Zero, Miami, Flint, Cleveland and New Haven. As she brings us through all these different places, the reader learns so much about the individual lives of undocumented Americans and the struggles they face.
I, personally, have been reading a lot of books surrounding the issues and unjustifiable treatment the undocumented American community faces upon reaching the United States, but this was so augmenting. There was so much information in this book that I didn''t know about and couldn''t even begin to imagine happening to other human beings.
This read truly does humble you in so many ways. As a first generation Dominican woman, I am profoundly reminded of my privilege. No matter who you are, what your background is, if you yourself are not an undocumented American you feel so deeply for the people in this book and it makes you really reconsider all the stupid, little things you complain about. There are so many people out there right now struggling unfathomably and arduously fighting against this horrible system in the United States- the place they came to for a better life for their families. Over and over again, the U.S disappoints.
I''m so grateful to have been able to read this and expand my knowledge even more in terms of the current immigration system in the United States and the lives of REAL people.
The information in this book is RAW, REAL, and truly HUMBLING. I recommend this book to everyone, just to stay informed and empower you to make a difference. Maybe think a little bit before deciding to side with He Who Shall Not Be Named in the upcoming election #imissbernie
15 people found this helpful
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Jessica Darden
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
All praise to Karla Villavicencio
Reviewed in the United States on May 1, 2020
This book is powerful! It''s an own voices report of the undocumented experience. This book is poignant and relevant. It Opens our eyes to the plight of the undocumented community. This story exposes the negligence of this country''s immigration system. This book exposes... See more
This book is powerful! It''s an own voices report of the undocumented experience. This book is poignant and relevant. It Opens our eyes to the plight of the undocumented community. This story exposes the negligence of this country''s immigration system. This book exposes humanity and should move everyone to support undocumented immigrants in this country. We should be pushing for legislation that assists those coming into our country to have better lives, not continue to demonize them or hinder them access to medical care education and employment. Karla opens the eyes of the reader but most importantly she tears at your heart. Let''s support all she''s doing in her work.
10 people found this helpful
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Lucía
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Reseña
Reviewed in Spain on October 14, 2020
«I grew up with nightmares but they are living through nightmares.» Creo que la sinopsis de este libro lo dice todo, una maravilla de libro que recomiendo a todo el mundo. Os dejo la sinopsis en español para los que no os llevéis bien con el inglés: Una de las primeras...See more
«I grew up with nightmares but they are living through nightmares.» Creo que la sinopsis de este libro lo dice todo, una maravilla de libro que recomiendo a todo el mundo. Os dejo la sinopsis en español para los que no os llevéis bien con el inglés: Una de las primeras inmigrantes indocumentadas en graduarse de Harvard revela las vidas ocultas de sus compañeros estadounidenses indocumentados en este retrato profundamente personal e innovador de una nación. La escritora Karla Cornejo Villavicencio estaba en DACA cuando decidió escribir sobre ser indocumentada por primera vez usando su propio nombre. Fue justo después de las elecciones de 2016, el día en que se dio cuenta de que la historia de la que había intentado evitar era la única que quería contar. Así que escribió el número de teléfono de su abogado de inmigración en la mano con rotulador y se embarcó en un viaje por todo el país para contar las historias de sus compañeros inmigrantes indocumentados y encontrar la clave oculta de la suya. Mirando más allá de los focos de conflicto de la frontera o del activismo de los DREAMers, Cornejo Villavicencio explora la vida de los indocumentados y los misterios de su propia vida. Encuentra que la nación de personajes singulares y efervescentes a menudo se reduce en los medios de comunicación a peones políticos o trabajadores sin nombre. Las historias que cuenta no son diferentes ni ingenuamente inspiradoras, sino que muestran el amor, la magia, la angustia, la locura y la vulgaridad que infunden la vida cotidiana de sus sujetos. En Nueva York, conocemos a los trabajadores indocumentados que fueron reclutados para la limpieza de la Zona Cero financiada con fondos federales después del 11 de Septiembre. En Miami, ingresamos a las omnipresentes botánicas, que ofrecen hierbas y pociones medicinales a aquellos cuyo estatus los bloquea de cualquier otra opción de atención médica. En Flint, Michigan, nos enteramos de las demandas de identificación estatal para recibir agua limpia que salve vidas. En Connecticut, Cornejo Villavicencio, sin hijos por elección, encuentra familia en dos adolescentes cuyo padre está en un santuario. Y a pesar de todo, vemos a la autora lidiando con las cuestiones más importantes del amor, el deber, la familia y la supervivencia. Con su voz incandescente e incansable, Cornejo Villavicencio combina reportajes sensibles y poderosas narrativas personales para sacar a la luz historias notables de resiliencia, locura y muerte. A través de estas historias llegamos a comprender lo que realmente significa ser un extraviado. Un prescindible. Un héroe. Un americano. 👉Súper consejo: Como siempre el audiolibro narrado por la autora merece mucho la pena.
«I grew up with nightmares but they are living through nightmares.»

Creo que la sinopsis de este libro lo dice todo, una maravilla de libro que recomiendo a todo el mundo. Os dejo la sinopsis en español para los que no os llevéis bien con el inglés:

Una de las primeras inmigrantes indocumentadas en graduarse de Harvard revela las vidas ocultas de sus compañeros estadounidenses indocumentados en este retrato profundamente personal e innovador de una nación.

La escritora Karla Cornejo Villavicencio estaba en DACA cuando decidió escribir sobre ser indocumentada por primera vez usando su propio nombre. Fue justo después de las elecciones de 2016, el día en que se dio cuenta de que la historia de la que había intentado evitar era la única que quería contar. Así que escribió el número de teléfono de su abogado de inmigración en la mano con rotulador y se embarcó en un viaje por todo el país para contar las historias de sus compañeros inmigrantes indocumentados y encontrar la clave oculta de la suya.

Mirando más allá de los focos de conflicto de la frontera o del activismo de los DREAMers, Cornejo Villavicencio explora la vida de los indocumentados y los misterios de su propia vida. Encuentra que la nación de personajes singulares y efervescentes a menudo se reduce en los medios de comunicación a peones políticos o trabajadores sin nombre. Las historias que cuenta no son diferentes ni ingenuamente inspiradoras, sino que muestran el amor, la magia, la angustia, la locura y la vulgaridad que infunden la vida cotidiana de sus sujetos.

En Nueva York, conocemos a los trabajadores indocumentados que fueron reclutados para la limpieza de la Zona Cero financiada con fondos federales después del 11 de Septiembre. En Miami, ingresamos a las omnipresentes botánicas, que ofrecen hierbas y pociones medicinales a aquellos cuyo estatus los bloquea de cualquier otra opción de atención médica. En Flint, Michigan, nos enteramos de las demandas de identificación estatal para recibir agua limpia que salve vidas. En Connecticut, Cornejo Villavicencio, sin hijos por elección, encuentra familia en dos adolescentes cuyo padre está en un santuario. Y a pesar de todo, vemos a la autora lidiando con las cuestiones más importantes del amor, el deber, la familia y la supervivencia.

Con su voz incandescente e incansable, Cornejo Villavicencio combina reportajes sensibles y poderosas narrativas personales para sacar a la luz historias notables de resiliencia, locura y muerte. A través de estas historias llegamos a comprender lo que realmente significa ser un extraviado. Un prescindible. Un héroe. Un americano.

👉Súper consejo: Como siempre el audiolibro narrado por la autora merece mucho la pena.
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William Lara
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
True history
Reviewed in Germany on July 16, 2020
Compelling chronicle of real facts!
Compelling chronicle of real facts!
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2021 The online online Undocumented Americans online sale

2021 The online online Undocumented Americans online sale

2021 The online online Undocumented Americans online sale

2021 The online online Undocumented Americans online sale

2021 The online online Undocumented Americans online sale

2021 The online online Undocumented Americans online sale

2021 The online online Undocumented Americans online sale

2021 The online online Undocumented Americans online sale

2021 The online online Undocumented Americans online sale

2021 The online online Undocumented Americans online sale

2021 The online online Undocumented Americans online sale

2021 The online online Undocumented Americans online sale

2021 The online online Undocumented Americans online sale

2021 The online online Undocumented Americans online sale

2021 The online online Undocumented Americans online sale

2021 The online online Undocumented Americans online sale

2021 The online online Undocumented Americans online sale

2021 The online online Undocumented Americans online sale

2021 The online online Undocumented Americans online sale

2021 The online online Undocumented Americans online sale

2021 The online online Undocumented Americans online sale

2021 The online online Undocumented Americans online sale

2021 The online online Undocumented Americans online sale

2021 The online online Undocumented Americans online sale

2021 The online online Undocumented Americans online sale

2021 The online online Undocumented Americans online sale

2021 The online online Undocumented Americans online sale

2021 The online online Undocumented Americans online sale

2021 The online online Undocumented Americans online sale