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discount The new arrival Kingdom: high quality A novel outlet online sale

discount The new arrival Kingdom: high quality A novel outlet online sale

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“I read The Kingdom and couldn’t put it down ... Suspenseful ... Original ... This one is special in every way.” —Stephen King

Two brothers. One small town. A lifetime of dark secrets. A tense and atmospheric standalone thriller from best-selling author Jo Nesbø.


Roy has never left the quiet mountain town he grew up in, unlike his little brother Carl who couldn''t wait to get out and escape his troubled past. Just like everyone else in town, Roy believed Carl was gone for good. But Carl has big plans for his hometown. And when he returns with a mysterious new wife and a business opportunity that seems too good to be true, simmering tensions begin to surface and unexplained deaths in the town''s past come under new scrutiny. Soon powerful players set their sights on taking the brothers down by exposing their role in the town''s sordid history.

But Roy and Carl are survivors, and no strangers to violence. Roy has always protected his younger brother. As the body count rises, though, Roy''s loyalty to family is tested. And then Roy finds himself inextricably drawn to Carl''s wife, Shannon, an attraction that will have devastating consequences. Roy''s world is coming apart and soon there will be no turning back. He''ll be forced to choose between his own flesh and blood and a future he had never dared to believe possible.

Review

A KIRKUS REVIEWS BEST MYSTERY AND THRILLER OF THE YEAR

“Mesmerizing . . . A dense suspenseful bundle of Norwegian noir.” —Richard Lipez, The Washington Post
 
“Intricately plotted . . . With The Kingdom, Nesbø builds a slow-burn thriller that leaps to myriad twists as he peels back the brothers'' strong relationship, which is partially built on terrible secrets and tinged with violence.” —Oline Cogdill, South Florida Sun-Sentinel

The Kingdom, like most Jo Nesbo novels, is rooted in crime, mystery and the exploration of long-held dark secrets . . . Vivid characters speak dialogue that is always pungent and convincing . . . Mr. Nesbo explores the depths of the human psyche, along with more mundane foibles of a closed society. One of the more interesting questions, not resolved until the end, is just who will survive.” —Robert Croan, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

The Kingdom, much like a rollercoaster begins slowly as Nesbo sets the stage and explains the intricate web of connections all of the characters have with each other after living in a small town together for decades. Once all of the characters are in place, Nesbo flips the switch and sends readers hurdling along the track as he reveals the numerous crimes the brothers have committed and the motives that led them along their path.” —Hearst Connecticut Media Group

“Our current love affair with Nordic noir continues unabated, and the Norwegian writer Jo Nesbo is a virtuoso of the genre . . . His latest crime thriller, The Kingdom, is set in a small mountain town, where a mechanic’s life is upended by the unexpected homecoming of his younger brother, his brother’s mysterious wife, and the unspooling of chilling family secrets.” Avenue Magazine

 “Nesbo is always a great storyteller. The world he depicts is bleak and potentially depressing, but he presents it with relentless power.”  — John M. Clum, New York Journal of Books
 
The Kingdom [is] in some ways more American in tone than Scandinavian . . . [it] picks up speed, until Roy is swept up in the momentum of his own story.” — The New York Times Book Review

“ [A] richly characterized, perfectly paced and plotted thriller.” — The Lineup

“For mystery readers in search of heroes a shade darker than Agatha Christie’s Hercule Poirot, enter . . . Jo Nesbø . . . The Kingdom, Nesbø’s new standalone story, sees him peeling back layers of unnerving secrets surrounding a pair of brothers in Oslo, from their parents’ mysterious deaths to their family’s disturbing history and the secrets of their hometown.” TIME, “The 42 Most Anticipated Books of Fall 2020”

“The Kingdom is a complex and simmering standalone novel from the author of the popular Harry Hole detective series, and it dives deeply into the psyches of its characters. Twisty, violent, gripping, and very disturbing.” Buzzfeed

“Captivating . . . Guaranteed to be in high demand. As the story unfolds, it builds in dread and depravity. The small-town atmosphere resembles a Peyton Place as envisioned in an unlikely collaboration between Raymond Chandler and Henrik Ibsen. The complex characters and twisting plot will keep readers turning the pages and eager to discuss.” Library Journal
 
“Echoes of such classic noir authors as Dorothy B. Hughes, James M. Cain, and Jim Thompson … Nesbø brilliantly uses the insularity of Roy’s world, both internally and externally, to accentuate the Shakespearean inevitability of the impending tragedy.”— Booklist (starred review)

Nesbø peels away the secrets surrounding Carl’s project, his backstory, and his connections to his old neighbors so methodically that most readers, like frogs in a gradually warming pan of water, will take quite a while to realize just how extensive, wholesale, and disturbing those secrets really are. The illusions of a family and its close-knit town constructed and demolished on a truly epic scale.” — Kirkus (starred review)

“Twisty … Fans of classic noir such as Double Indemnity will be hooked.” — Publishers Weekly

About the Author

JO NESBØ is a musician, songwriter, economist, and #1 New York Times best-selling author. He has won the Raymond Chandler Award for Lifetime Achievement as well as many other awards. His books have sold 45 million copies worldwide and have been translated into 50 languages. His Harry Hole novels include The Redeemer, The Snowman, The Leopard, Phantom, and most recently Knife, and he is also the author of The Son, Headhunters, Macbeth, and several children''s books. He lives in Oslo.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

I heard him before I saw him.


Carl was back. I don’t know why I thought of Dog, it was almost twenty years ago. Maybe I suspected the reason for this sudden and unannounced homecoming was the same as it was back then. The same as it always was. That he needed his big brother’s help. I was standing out in the yard and looked at my watch. Two thirty. He’d sent a text message, that was all. Said they’d probably arrive by two. But my little brother’s always been an optimist, always promised more than he could deliver. I looked out over the landscape. The little bit of it that showed above the cloud cover below me. The slope on the other side of the valley looked like it was floating in a sea of grey. Already the vegetation up here on the heights had a touch of autumnal red. Above me the sky was heavenly blue and as clear as the gaze of a pure young girl. The air was good and cold, it nipped at my lungs if I breathed in too quickly. I felt as though I was completely alone, had the whole world to myself. Well, a world that was just Mount Ararat with a farm on it. Tourists sometimes drove up the twisting road from the village to enjoy the view, and sooner or later they would always end up in our yard here. They usually asked if I still ran the smallholding. The reason these idiots referred to it as a smallholding was probably that they thought a proper farm would have to be like one of those you get down on the lowlands, with vast fields, oversized barns and enormous and splendid farmhouses. They had never seen what a storm in the mountains could do to a roof that was a bit too large or tried to start a fire in a room that was a little too big with a gale thirty degrees below blowing through the wall. They didn’t know the difference between cultivated land and wilderness, that a mountain farm is grazing for animals and can be a wilderness kingdom many times the size of the ashy, corn-yellow fields of a lowland farmer.
 
For fifteen years I had been living here alone, but now that was over. A V8 engine growled and snarled somewhere down below the cloud cover. Sounded so close it had to have passed the corner at Japansvingen halfway up the climb. The driver put his foot down, took his foot off, rounded a hairpin bend, foot down again. Closer and closer. You could tell he’d navigated those bends before. And now that I could hear the nuances in the sound of the engine, the deep sighs when he changed gear, that deep bass note that’s unique to a Cadillac in low gear, I knew it was a DeVille. Same as the great black beast our dad had driven. Of course.
 
And there was the aggressive jut of the grille of a DeVille, rounding Geitesvingen. Black, but more recent; I guessed an ’85 model. The accompaniment the same though.
 
The car drove right up to me and the window on the driver’s side slid down. I hoped it didn’t show, but my heart was pounding like a piston. How many letters, text messages and emails and phone calls had we exchanged in all these years? Not many. And yet: had even a single day passed when I didn’t think about Carl? Probably not. But missing him was better than dealing with Carl-trouble. The first thing I noticed was that he looked older.
 
‘Excuse me, my good man, but does this farm belong to the famous Opgard brothers?’
 
And then he grinned. Gave me that warm, wide irresistible smile, and it was as though time was wiped from his face, as well as the calendar which told me it had been fifteen years since last time. But there was also something quizzical about his face, as though he were testing the waters. I didn’t want to laugh. Not yet. But I couldn’t help it.
 
The car door opened. He spread his arms wide and I leaned into his embrace. Something tells me it should have been the other way round. That it was me – the big brother – who should have been inviting the embrace. But somewhere along the line the division of roles between me and Carl had become unclear. He had grown bigger than me, both physically and as a person, and – at least when we were in the company of others – now he was the one conducting the orchestra. I closed my eyes, trembling, took a quavering breath, breathed in the smell of autumn, of Cadillac and kid brother. He was wearing some kind of ‘male fragrance’, as they call it.
 
The passenger door had opened.
 
Carl let go of me and walked me round the enormous front end of the car to where she stood, facing the valley.
 
‘It’s really lovely here,’ she said. She was thin and slightly built, but her voice was deep. Her accent was obvious, and although she got the intonation wrong, at least the sentence was Norwegian. I wondered if it was something she had been rehearsing on the drive up, something she had made up her mind to say whether she meant it or not. Something that would make me like her, whether I wanted to or not. Then she turned towards me and smiled. The first thing I noticed was that her face was white. Not pale, but white like snow that reflects light in such a way as to make it difficult to see the contours in it. The second was the eyelid of one of her eyes. It drooped, like a half-drawn blind. As though half of her was very sleepy. But the other half looked wide awake. A lively brown eye peering out at me from beneath a short crop of flaming red hair. She was wearing a simple black coat with no sidecut and there was no indication of shape beneath it either, just a black, high-necked sweater sticking up above the collar. The general first impression was of a scrawny little kid photographed in black and white and the hair coloured in afterwards.
 
Carl always had a way with girls, so in all honesty I was a bit surprised. It wasn’t that she wasn’t sweet, because she actually was, but she wasn’t a smasher, as people round here say. She carried on smiling, and since the teeth could hardly be distinguished from the skin it meant they were white too. Carl had white teeth too, always did have, unlike me. He used to joke and say it was because his were bleached by daylight because he smiled so much more. Maybe that was what they had fallen for in each other, the white teeth. Mirror images. Because even though Carl was tall and broad, fair and blue-eyed, I could see the likeness at once. Something life-enhancing, as people call it. Something optimistic that is prepared to see the best in people. Themselves as well as others. Well, maybe; of course, I didn’t know the girl yet.
 
‘This is—’ Carl began.
 
‘Shannon Alleyne,’ she interrupted, reaching out a hand so small that it felt like taking hold of a chicken’s foot.
 
‘Opgard,’ Carl added proudly.
 
Shannon Alleyne Opgard wanted to hold hands longer than me. I saw Carl in that too. Some are in more of a hurry to be liked than others.
 
‘Jet-lagged?’ I asked, and regretted it, feeling like an idiot for asking. Not because I didn’t know what jet lag was, but because Carl knew that I had never crossed even a single time zone and that whatever the answer was it wouldn’t mean a lot to me.
 
Carl shook his head. ‘We landed two days ago. Had to wait for the car – it came by boat.’
 
I nodded, glanced at the registration plates. MC. Monaco. Exotic, but not exotic enough for me to ask for it if the car was to be re-registered. On the walls of the office at the service station I had obsolete plates from French Equatorial Africa, Burma, Basutoland, British Honduras and Johor. The standard was high.
 
Shannon looked from Carl to me and then back again. Smiled. I don’t know why, maybe she was happy to see Carl and his big brother – his only close relative – laughing together. That the slight tension was gone now. That he – that they were welcome home.

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4.2 out of 54.2 out of 5
9,603 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

Gorilichis
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great for my insomnia.
Reviewed in the United States on November 15, 2020
How bad has 2020 been? It''s been so bad that Jo Nesbo published a book and I hated it. There are a few murders, but the pace is so, so slow that I had a hard time staying awake while reading. There''s too much introspection and internal monologues, the characters talk too... See more
How bad has 2020 been? It''s been so bad that Jo Nesbo published a book and I hated it. There are a few murders, but the pace is so, so slow that I had a hard time staying awake while reading. There''s too much introspection and internal monologues, the characters talk too much about their feelings and I just didn''t care what happened in the end. Nesbo has made me love plots that normally I wouldn''t enjoy, but this one was boring.
54 people found this helpful
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Drwo
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Unique Nesbo
Reviewed in the United States on November 15, 2020
This is unlike any other Jo Nesbo novel. The Kingdom is dark, complex and anguished, without a light moment ; full of obsession, family loyalty, love, abuse, cheating, and, of course, death. And lots of it. Two brothers, Roy and Carl, share guilty secrets, one... See more
This is unlike any other Jo Nesbo novel. The Kingdom is dark, complex and anguished, without a light moment ; full of obsession, family loyalty, love, abuse, cheating, and, of course, death. And lots of it.

Two brothers, Roy and Carl, share guilty secrets, one of which has tied Roy to living with gossip and disdain as he lives alone in the family''s beaten down home and works in a service station not far from the family land, a kingdom of barren mountain acreage with neither livestock nor crops. His younger, more clever and handsome brother, Carl, conned himself into a scholarship right out of high school and moved to Minnesota, then Toronto and 17 years pass when Carl suddenly returns home with a bride, Shannon.

Carl comes with a scheme to build a hotel on the family land and, because he has the gift of salesmanship, manages to involve the entire local population in his dream of property development. And, because Carl is the younger, more glib and better education brother, he manages to talk his more practical brother into going along with his schemes.

Shannon, for reasons which become clear, encourages Carl in his inflated dreams and when the past comes calling or plans go wrong, Roy, as always, comes to Carl''s rescue. Roy''s guilt is at the center of this book and it is that guilt which compels him to go to any extreme to protect Carl. When Shannon enters the equation, the balance is upset and the book enters into new territory, upsetting preconceived ideas and splitting Roy''s loyalties.

This is a difficult book to review as it is exhausting, demoralizing, bleak and long but so well written and brilliantly conceived that not reading it would be ignoring what is surely the best of Nesbo. I read it in two consecutive nights and was completely absorbed in the horror of it.
32 people found this helpful
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Kindle Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Nesbo shines in stand alone
Reviewed in the United States on November 15, 2020
Having read most of the Harry Hole books, I pre-ordered The Kingdom as soon as it was offered. And rural Norway and it''s murders are just as compellingly laid out as Hole''s Oslo cases. There is a noir flatness to these murders stretched out over almost 20 years, that... See more
Having read most of the Harry Hole books, I pre-ordered The Kingdom as soon as it was offered. And rural Norway and it''s murders are just as compellingly laid out as Hole''s Oslo cases. There is a noir flatness to these murders stretched out over almost 20 years, that somehow pulls you into the claustrophobic world of two brothers, joined in years of pain and shared secrets. It is not "Who done it" as much as How and a mild suggestion of Why. We are given only the most rudimentary glimpses into Carl and Roy Opgard''s minds but slowly learn what their shared coming of age was like. Carl is like their mother; Roy like his Dad. Carl''s good with words and people. Roy is only good with motor cars and Carl. Growing up on an isolated goat farm high up a mountain above the small village of Os, the boys become who they are by the pervasive isolation plus family . They may live in different locales but at one level they never leave the mountain. Carl went to school in America and achieved a level of financial success . Roy worked in the car repair and gas station in Os and dreamed of owning his own station. Then, when they are in their late thirties, Carl comes home to Os . And the story flows from there. A satisfying tale of pathology of a family infused with a growing sense of the wrongness of where their lives lead them. Don''t love it as much as Harry Hole stories, but in its own way utterly haunting.
20 people found this helpful
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VICKI HERBERT
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Do what has to be done and do it now...
Reviewed in the United States on November 19, 2020
No spoilers. 5 stars. Roy and Carl, the brothers Opgard, live by their father''s maxim: Do what has to be done and do it now... Ironically, this was the same maxim that got their father murdered because... ... at a very young age their father had been... See more
No spoilers. 5 stars. Roy and Carl, the brothers Opgard, live by their father''s maxim: Do what has to be done and do it now...

Ironically, this was the same maxim that got their father murdered because...

... at a very young age their father had been raping Carl on the bottom bunk of the bunkbeds that the brothers shared while...

... older brother Roy was trying to sleep through it on the top bunk... as he heard the bed squeaking and Carl crying...

... Afterward, Roy would slip down to the lower bunk and comfort the sniffling Carl... while planning a way to murder their parents...

Do what has to be done and do it now...

Years later, when the brothers were grown men, they had several occasions to use their father''s mantra... and their Kingdom became a virtual graveyard...

This was the first of Jo Nesbo''s novels that I''ve read and I must say it was excellent! The last 10% was a wild, nail-biting, and suspenseful ride. Impressive!
14 people found this helpful
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Mal Warwick
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Jo Nesbø doesn''t seem to like any of the characters in this standalone thriller
Reviewed in the United States on December 1, 2020
There’s something wrong with the Opgard brothers. They’re both hard-working, clever, and good-looking to boot. The sheriff knows something’s amiss, but he can’t prove it. Roy’s the village’s car mechanic, and he runs the local service station well enough to keep the... See more
There’s something wrong with the Opgard brothers. They’re both hard-working, clever, and good-looking to boot. The sheriff knows something’s amiss, but he can’t prove it. Roy’s the village’s car mechanic, and he runs the local service station well enough to keep the corporate owners happy. And Carl, back after sixteen years in North America, returns with a gorgeous Barbados-born wife and a reputation as something of a wizard as an entrepreneur. But Carl’s ambitious scheme to build a spa hotel on their farm raises the stakes in the village to the limit. Then Roy’s carefully constructed defense against jealousy comes boiling to the surface . . . and the bodies start to drop. But that’s only the beginning of Jo Nesbø’s new standalone thriller, The Kingdom.

Jo Nesbø is best known in America as the author of the twelve Harry Hole detective stories, but he has also written fourteen other novels to date. The Kingdom is the fifth of his standalone thrillers. It reads like a more serious literary effort than the detective stories. For instance, here’s an excerpt from a soliloquy—there’s no other word for it—that Nesbø attributes to Shannon Alleyne, Carl’s wife, in an argument about World War II with one of the villagers:

“Our loyalty to our flock is underestimated. We shape morality so that it suits our purposes when we feel our group is under threat. Family vendettas and genocides throughout history are not the work of monsters but of human beings like us who believed they were acting in a way that was morally correct. Our loyalty is primarily to our own and secondarily to the changing morality that at any given time serves the needs of our group.”

You won’t catch Harry Hole talking like that! And that dialogue isn’t an isolated example. The Norwegian villagers also come across as an astoundingly articulate lot, capable of expressing their most profound thoughts at the drop of a hat—and seemingly compelled to do so.

Digging deeply into human psychology

Now, don’t get me wrong. The Harry Hole books are superb, for the most part. The dialogue, while often intelligent, mimics normal speech, at least as closely as the written word (and deft translation) can manage to do so without lacing every sentence with grunts and hesitations. And the plots, while invariably hard to believe, almost always work well, smoothly moving the reader along from one shock to the next. But like so much genre fiction, they’re essentially formulaic.

Harry Hole’s behavior might disappoint, but it’s always predictable. The Opgard brothers enter the scene as an entirely unknown quantity. The Kingdom, as a standalone effort, allows Nesbø to explore the brothers’ psychological depths and those of his other characters. He’s free of the restraints imposed by the Harry Hole formula—usually involving a serial killer—or what might have been revealed in previous books in the series.

The Kingdom is, of course, a worthy piece of work, and other reviewers have been kind. For example, the Washington Post (November 9, 2020) approvingly termed the book “a dense, suspenseful bundle of Norwegian noir.” And Kirkus (November 10, 2020), equally pleased with the book, referred to “the illusions of a family and its close-knit town constructed and demolished on a truly epic scale.” However, The Kingdom leaves me uneasy.

Does Jo Nesbø like these characters?

For all Harry Hole’s faults, and they are many, Nesbø seems to like the man. How else could he manage to write a dozen novels about him? But he doesn’t seem to like the Opgard brothers. Admittedly, they’re sociopaths, so they’re especially hard to like. But Nesbø doesn’t look all that kindly on most of the other characters, either. For instance, here’s Roy musing about the village woman who had seduced his brother when drunk and broken up his engagement: “I’m not saying Grete Smitt was actually evil, I’m sure there’s some psychiatric diagnosis or other that gives a more flattering definition.” And others in this standalone thriller don’t come off much better. Nesbø is too busy flaunting their deficiencies. Because this is, above all, a story about human frailty and capacity for violence. And I sometimes wonder whether there’s something wrong that drives me to keep reading this stuff.

About the author

Jo Nesbø (1960-) is surely one of Norway’s richest assets. His novels have reportedly sold more than three million copies in Norway alone—and the country’s population is hardly more than five million. Around the world, over thirty million additional copies have been sold in more than forty languages. He is surely the planet’s most famous Norwegian. But Nesbø isn’t just a writer. Fellow Norwegians know him as a rock star, a star soccer player, a journalist, and an economist. You’ll get a sense of Nesbø as a person from this fascinating interview in Crimereads (November 19, 2020).
13 people found this helpful
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James Arbuckle
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Really unpleasant read
Reviewed in the United States on November 13, 2020
I read about 30 books a year. Usually there is just one I don''t finish; this year that was Nesbo''s last, which was so disgustingly violent I early recognised that there was no character, nor any aspect of plot, of which I cared in the least. And so it is with... See more
I read about 30 books a year. Usually there is just one I don''t finish; this year that was Nesbo''s last, which was so disgustingly violent I early recognised that there was no character, nor any aspect of plot, of which I cared in the least.

And so it is with this one. Although I did finish it, I don''t really know why, as it seems even in retrospect to have been an exceptionally unpleasant book. No spoilers, but it is the first few pages apparent there are three mysteries in this plot. Two you will solve in the next few pages, and a third has only two possible outcomes so you have an even chance to solve it. You may or may not then slog on to a conclusion which is of as little interest as the reading towards it has been unpleasant. I did, but I won''t read this author again.
12 people found this helpful
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Alexandria L. Burton
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Painful read!
Reviewed in the United States on November 22, 2020
I’m only about 40% in- and will keep slogging along, just out of respect for Jo Nesbo - he’s such a great writer, I’ve devoured nearly all of his books - but parts of this are soooo slow and boring- other parts so distasteful-really struggling to get through. One of... See more
I’m only about 40% in- and will keep slogging along, just out of respect for Jo Nesbo - he’s such a great writer, I’ve devoured nearly all of his books - but parts of this are soooo slow and boring- other parts so distasteful-really struggling to get through.
One of those books you keep thinking maybe will get better - but rarely does, & you’re left wondering why you didn’t listen to yourself & give it up when you weren’t enjoying it.
I hope this will be one of those rare times that it pays off to stick with it- if so, I’ll come back and revise my review.
14 people found this helpful
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Joan L. Wettenstein
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
So incredibly wordy
Reviewed in the United States on February 2, 2021
The Harry Hole mysteries are all fantastic and I so wanted to like this book. Unfortunately nothing happened except more words and more uninteresting philosophy and definitely one dimensional characters. I can''t believe that I read the whole book but that was because I... See more
The Harry Hole mysteries are all fantastic and I so wanted to like this book. Unfortunately nothing happened except more words and more uninteresting philosophy and definitely one dimensional characters. I can''t believe that I read the whole book but that was because I anticipated something happening. Which it didn''t. I''m not into birds or cars or homespun philosophy or mountain views. The editor could have eliminated the first 250 pages and then I rather think the book might have moved along with an ending in sight. It was definitely one of the most boring books I have ever forced myself to finish.
10 people found this helpful
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Top reviews from other countries

Shaiano
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Not sure on this...
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on October 1, 2020
I''ll start by saying i''m a big fan of Jo Nesbo, the Harry Hole series were fantastic and his stand alone novels were great (particularly the son). I was excited for this release, and the synopsis sounded very interesting - 2 brothers, one successful, the other never leaving...See more
I''ll start by saying i''m a big fan of Jo Nesbo, the Harry Hole series were fantastic and his stand alone novels were great (particularly the son). I was excited for this release, and the synopsis sounded very interesting - 2 brothers, one successful, the other never leaving the family farm and maintaining the same old life. Then the younger brother returns, with his new wife and past secrets begin to surface and cause problems for the brothers. I liked the characters, and the emotional aspect of the novel (no spoilers) is gripping and heartfelt. But the problem is that the book seems to go on forever. I feel like I''ve been reading for the past year non-stop and still not finished it. I''m sure why this is, whether the character development is to heavy which makes it feel dragged out or what. Also, the situations the family find themselves in, and how they are dealt with seem a bit far-fetched and random. The editing is poor in some parts as well - I know its translated in to English but this hasn''t been a problem with Jo Nesbo''s books before. Random words are inserted in sentences, well known sayings are reversed and make no sense. Overall a good story, but not one of his best. A good idea, but probably overthought in some areas and never really got going for me.
62 people found this helpful
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Arkadiusz Bober
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Avoid. Don’t think Jo Nesbo ever wrote/read it...
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on October 23, 2020
Very disappointing. I rarely give up on books. Usually finish them however bad they are. This is that rare time I have stopped on 70something... Book landed in a recycling bin to prevent anyone from having disappointment of their lives. Love Nesbo for Harry Hole &...See more
Very disappointing. I rarely give up on books. Usually finish them however bad they are. This is that rare time I have stopped on 70something... Book landed in a recycling bin to prevent anyone from having disappointment of their lives. Love Nesbo for Harry Hole & Headhunters but this one seems like a bad ghost writing. Avoid!
46 people found this helpful
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lewesian
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Very disappointing
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on October 5, 2020
I''ve been reading the Harry Hole series for years but this, like his previous ''Macbeth'' novel is very disappointing. It was a struggle to get through, I felt no sympathy or empathy with any of the characters and the ending of the book just sort of petered out.
39 people found this helpful
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Simon
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Snore
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on November 12, 2020
I can sympathise with authors who don''t want to be defined and remembered for only writing one genre - this is presumably the case with Jo Nesbo, who has written the highly successful and engaging Harry Hole books. He recently departed from his winning formula though to...See more
I can sympathise with authors who don''t want to be defined and remembered for only writing one genre - this is presumably the case with Jo Nesbo, who has written the highly successful and engaging Harry Hole books. He recently departed from his winning formula though to write the utterly ghastly ''Macbeth'' and has now inflicted us with ''The Kingdom''. I didn''t enjoy the read and found it a plod. To be fair, the pace picked up a bit in the second half but it could never be confused with a good book. I think Mr Nesbo should count his blessings and be grateful for his ability to write compulsive page-turners such as the Hary Hole series. I would certainly be pleased is he stopped pressing literary experiments like this on us.
30 people found this helpful
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Regular Shopper
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Not Jo Nesbo’s best
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on October 1, 2020
Whilst it was an easy read, it was tedious and somewhat predictable. Much prefer the Harry Hole books and the other stand alone books were better.
23 people found this helpful
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